BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

In order to avoid clogging up the more general thread(s) with requests to see one question or discussion of clue placement in / relative stupidity of one specific question, please discuss specific questions here. This thread will also serve as a place to note factual errors for fixing in later incarnations of the set.
Last edited by Adventure Temple Trail on Sun May 19, 2013 10:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Urech hydantoin synthesis »

What was the clue about Tamar in the David tossup (round 13)? One team said that was inaccurate because Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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If you could post the question (or just the first clue) on the black death, that'd be appreciated,
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Christ, I Know wrote:What was the clue about Tamar in the David tossup (round 13)? One team said that was inaccurate because Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah.
BHSAT, Round 13 wrote: 10. One legend about this man says that he didn’t understand the use of spiders, mosquitoes, or insanity until all three helped save his life; in particular, he was forced to feign madness before Achish, king of Gath. A feud among this man's sons began after his daughter Tamar was raped by her half-brother Amnon, and he survived the rebellion of his long-haired son Absalom. This man had Uriah killed in battle after committing adultery with Bathsheba. This man's closest friend was Jonathan, the son of his predecessor Saul. For 10 points, name this King of Israel who, as a youth, used a stone to defeat Goliath.
ANSWER: King David
According to a lookup I just did, there are two Tamars in the Old Testament (one in Genesis, one later); I'll see if there's anything I can/should do to the wording to make it clearer that this one is David's daughter.
BHSAT, Round 13 wrote: 11. The Statute of Laborers was passed in reaction to this event which, according to Gabriele de’ Mussi, grew significantly after Janibeg’s Siege of Caffa in Crimea. Masks with bird beaks were worn by professionals trying to stop this event, which occurred after the Great Famine, and during it rioters attacked Jews in Cologne for allegedly poisoning wells. It caused the peak of travelling Flagellant orders and a scarcity of labor that weakened feudalism. The catapulting of corpses by the Golden Horde worsened this crisis, which was spread by Yersinia pestis on ships and Silk Road rats’ fleas. For 10 points, what 1300s epidemic killed over a third of Europe’s people?
ANSWER: Black Death [or Black Plague; or bubonic plague; or Great Plague; or Great Pestilence; or Great Mortality; or pneumonic Plague; or septicemic plague; prompt on “plague”; prompt on “Yersinia pestis” or “Y. pestis” before mentioned; prompt on “Pasteurella pestis”; prompt on “P. pestis”] <JW>
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Golden-backed Whistler »

Could you please post the Wolfenstein/Half-Life/FPS bonus from Round 7? If I remember correctly, it is mentioned in the first part that Wolfenstein 3D is a FPS.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Urech hydantoin synthesis »

There were also several duplicated bonuses - I don't remember which bonuses exactly, but they seemed to be limited to rounds 11 through 13.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Golden-backed Whistler wrote:Could you please post the Wolfenstein/Half-Life/FPS bonus from Round 7? If I remember correctly, it is mentioned in the first part that Wolfenstein 3D is a FPS.
You're correct about this problem; it will be fixed for future sites.
Christ, I Know wrote:There were also several duplicated bonuses - I don't remember which bonuses exactly, but they seemed to be limited to rounds 11 through 13.
I've found the two reported instances of this (a duplicate of the galaxies bonus and a duplicate of the random number generation bonus) and replaced them with the bonuses which were meant to be there for future sites.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Kilroy Was Here »

I feel as if the word order for the first clue of the black plague tossup should be re-arranged to say something like "in response to this event, the statute of laborers......." as the statue of laborers was the cause of Wat Tyler's rebellion, which made me neg that tossup with Wat Tyler's rebellion.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by 1992 in spaceflight »

Ok, so here are my thoughts on the set. I'm going through all of the packets.
Bonus 7, Packet 1 wrote:In one drawing, this man depicted two hands bursting out of a sheet of paper which are each holding pens to draw the other one. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this Dutch artist, whose paradoxical and recursive scenes include a staircase whose bottom connects to its top.
ANSWER: M.C. Escher [or Maurits Cornelius Escher]
[10] One man of this surname used Escher art to exemplify “strange loops” in his book Godel, Escher, Bach. A historian of this surname collected short presidential bios in The American Political Tradition.
ANSWER: Hofstader [accept Richard Hofstader or Douglas Hofstader]
[10] These two figures, an animal and a mythical warrior, engage in dialogues in the book Godel, Escher, Bach. In Zeno’s paradox of motion, the animal in this pair gets a head-start in a footrace and the human can never catch up.
ANSWER: Achilles and the tortoise [accept turtle in place of tortoise]
I have no idea if Achilles and the tortoise was the easy part, but this bonus is incredibly hard. I've never heard of Escher and I've barely heard of Hofstader.

In round 2, tossup 16, the protagonist of Their Eyes Were Watching God is Janie Crawford, not Janue, like my packet claimed.
Round 4, Bonus 14 wrote:[10] In July’s People, a yellow example of these trucks is controlled by the black servant July, much to Maureen Smales’s horror. This vehicle is eventually stolen by Daniel.
ANSWER: a bakkie
I don't have any remote idea what this is. That seems excessively hard.
Packet 5, Tossup 11 wrote:Its adherent believe
I'm really hoping you meant to say adherents believe.

I'll post more thoughts later on (hopefully tomorrow).
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi wrote:I have no idea if Achilles and the tortoise was the easy part, but this bonus is incredibly hard. I've never heard of Escher and I've barely heard of Hofstader.
Interestingly, I assumed that Escher was to be considered the "easy part" of this bonus.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Golden-backed Whistler wrote:
The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi wrote:I have no idea if Achilles and the tortoise was the easy part, but this bonus is incredibly hard. I've never heard of Escher and I've barely heard of Hofstader.
Interestingly, I assumed that Escher was to be considered the "easy part" of this bonus.
The intended bonus structure was easy/hard/middle. In my experience, MC Escher is a pretty well-known figure in at least the segment of the general public I've been exposed to. He doesn't come up a lot, probably for reasons of inherent transparency (his hallmark use of odd/loopy/recursive subject matter makes it hard to write a good tossup on him), but I've heard people say, for example, "that's so MC Escher" when they see something odd/loopy/recursive, but he seemed appropriately easy as general knowledge if not as quizbowl visual art. I'd be interested to hear more from other people about this, ideally alongside comments about other stuff such that we don't get derailed into one question for a long string of posts. I'll think about whether "_Achilles_ and the _tortoise_" is a little bit unforgiving for a middle part (I may shift it so the bonus part only asks about one). I think the part on the Hofstaders has to stay to keep the bonus coherent, even though it's one of the tougher hard parts in the set - Douglas Hofstader's Godel, Escher, Bach, besides being the theme of the bonus, is a pretty well-known pop science/pop math/unclassified-intellectual book, and Richard Hofstader's presidential essays are often given out in AP US History classes - but if there's a radically different solution (i.e. "Answer these questions about Douglas Hofstader's magnum opus... [10] This artist is in the title with Godel and Bach...") I'll think about one.
The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi wrote:
Round 4, Bonus 14 wrote:[10] In July’s People, a yellow example of these trucks is controlled by the black servant July, much to Maureen Smales’s horror. This vehicle is eventually stolen by Daniel.
ANSWER: a bakkie
I don't have any remote idea what this is. That seems excessively hard.
Grace Liu and I both noticed that the word "bakkie" is often seen as a buzzword/"one to one association" for Nadine Gordimer/July's People, but most American quizbowlers wouldn't actually know what it means by mere association alone, so I left this part as-is to see if people had read the book or could actually respond with the word given its definition. I'll be flipping through the book to see if this merits its own hard part on "this is really important to the novel" grounds, but I'm not wedded to it if it's not.
people wrote:your grammar are bads here, here, and here
I'm fixing up the grammar problems and typos as they get reported (the Janie one was a mistake; I've read that book), and will be doing another sweep for errors before the main site runs.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Escher is fine for an easy part. Some NAQT conversion data: answered in 64 out of 67 rooms at the 2010 HSNCT; answered in all 36 rooms that heard it from IS #105.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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bt_green_warbler wrote:Escher is fine for an easy part. Some NAQT conversion data: answered in 64 out of 67 rooms at the 2010 HSNCT; answered in all 36 rooms that heard it from IS #105.
I gladly stand corrected about Escher then.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi wrote:
Round 4, Bonus 14 wrote:[10] In July’s People, a yellow example of these trucks is controlled by the black servant July, much to Maureen Smales’s horror. This vehicle is eventually stolen by Daniel.
ANSWER: a bakkie
I didn't make it through the entirety of July's People, but it's certainly mentioned sufficiently near the beginning that anyone who has read it should have gotten the part. It's also pretty central to the plot; I think it makes a fine hard part..
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Packet 6, Bonus 11 wrote:It takes its title from a song by the fictional Judy Bridgewater, and at the end of this novel, Kathy H. dreams of finding Tommy again in Norfolk, her “lost corner” of England. For 10 points each:
[10] Identify this 2004 novel narrated by a “carer” who prepares fellow clones for organ donation. In this Kazuo Ishiguro work, Kathy recounts episodes from her childhood at Hailsham with Tommy and Ruth.
Is Never Let Me Go really that common now that we can ask it for a hard part?
Packet 7, Tossup 5 wrote:The Hermitian inner product maps vectors over this field onto this field.
I literally did not know what you were trying to say here.
Packet 7, bonus 10 wrote:The repetition-heavy Meisner technique and Viewpoints are two ways of teaching this skill, which was defined in terms of attaining “objectives” by Stanislavsky. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this profession of Richard Burbage in the Shakespearean Lord Chamberlain’s Men. In ancient Greece, all workers in this job were male and wore emotion-specific masks for scenes.
ANSWER: acting [or being an actor; or actress; or playing a character]
[10] Marlon Brando used this acting style, which involves intense emotional recall of the actor’s personal experiences. It led Daniel Day Lewis to build a canoe before filming The Last of the Mohicans.
ANSWER: method acting
[10] This 18th-century master actor pioneered a more natural style and managed the Drury Lane Theater. This friend of Samuel Johnson gained fame for his look of surprise when his Hamlet saw the ghost.
ANSWER: David Garrick
I cannot tell how you how thrilled I was to see Meissner come up as a clue, as that was literally one of the first things we learned in my Acting I class.
Packet 7, bonus 17 wrote:Name both the bride and the groom at the wedding where Eris threw the apple. The bride was an ocean nymph and the groom was an exiled prince of Aegina.
I feel like another clue needs to be given here to indicate Peleus. Maybe include that they were given talking horses as a present?

In the Artemis tossup (TU 16, packet 8), aren't the giants the Aloadae, not the Aloedae?

Other than the minor issues I've noticed, this was a great set.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi wrote:
Packet 7, Tossup 5 wrote:The Hermitian inner product maps vectors over this field onto this field.
I literally did not know what you were trying to say here.
"The Hermitian inner product maps vectors over the complex numbers onto the complex numbers" seems to me to be a perfectly cromulent statement. Or, equivalently and more English-ly, "The Hermitian inner product is an operation which, when applied to two complex-valued vectors, yields a complex number", but that doesn't map back onto quizbowlese well. Is there some reason you find this to be an unsatisfactory phrasing?

P.S. Matt Jackson: "Hofstadter", not "Hofstader"
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by 1992 in spaceflight »

Excelsior (smack) wrote:
The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi wrote:
Packet 7, Tossup 5 wrote:The Hermitian inner product maps vectors over this field onto this field.
I literally did not know what you were trying to say here.
"The Hermitian inner product maps vectors over the complex numbers onto the complex numbers" seems to me to be a perfectly cromulent statement. Or, equivalently and more English-ly, "The Hermitian inner product is an operation which, when applied to two complex-valued vectors, yields a complex number", but that doesn't map back onto quizbowlese well. Is there some reason you find this to be an unsatisfactory phrasing?

P.S. Matt Jackson: "Hofstadter", not "Hofstader"
I was just confused by the way the statement was phrased (a science/math expert, I am not). Your explanation makes sense for the question, now.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Weighted Companion Cube wrote:I feel as if the word order for the first clue of the black plague tossup should be re-arranged to say something like "in response to this event, the statute of laborers......." as the statue of laborers was the cause of Wat Tyler's rebellion, which made me neg that tossup with Wat Tyler's rebellion.
I also agree this is the better phrasing of that question and also establishes the pronoun with far greater clarity.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Jeremy Gibbs Paradox wrote:
Weighted Companion Cube wrote:I feel as if the word order for the first clue of the black plague tossup should be re-arranged to say something like "in response to this event, the statute of laborers......." as the statue of laborers was the cause of Wat Tyler's rebellion, which made me neg that tossup with Wat Tyler's rebellion.
I also agree this is the better phrasing of that question and also establishes the pronoun with far greater clarity.
For future sites, the first sentence of this question has been changed to the following:
BHSAT 2013 (Revised for March 2) wrote:One legal reaction to this event was the Statute of Laborers. According to Gabriele de’ Mussi, it grew significantly after Janibeg’s Siege of Caffa in Crimea.
Answer line may be changed somewhat so other answers are accepted/prompted as appropriate.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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RyuAqua wrote:
Jeremy Gibbs Paradox wrote:
Weighted Companion Cube wrote:I feel as if the word order for the first clue of the black plague tossup should be re-arranged to say something like "in response to this event, the statute of laborers......." as the statue of laborers was the cause of Wat Tyler's rebellion, which made me neg that tossup with Wat Tyler's rebellion.
I also agree this is the better phrasing of that question and also establishes the pronoun with far greater clarity.
For future sites, the first sentence of this question has been changed to the following:
BHSAT 2013 (Revised for March 2) wrote:One legal reaction to this event was the Statute of Laborers. According to Gabriele de’ Mussi, it grew significantly after Janibeg’s Siege of Caffa in Crimea.
Answer line may be changed somewhat so other answers are accepted/prompted as appropriate.
Yeah I'd agree.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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BHSAT was a fun set filled with new, interesting ideas and Norcross had a great time. Thanks for the effort!

Do you think I could see the tossups on "cross-dressing" and "Kreb's Cycle"? I believe the latter said something about phosphofructokinase catalyzing a step in the Kreb's cycle in the first clue, while I believe it actually catalyzes the third step of glycolysis (the answer I buzzed in with). I might have just jumped the gun and stupidly buzzed out of excitement.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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BHSAT 2013, Packet 6 wrote:13. At Flora Macdonald’s request, this thing was done by Bonnie Prince Charlie on the Isle of Skye after the failed ‘45 uprising. Man Ray’s Rrose Selavy photographs show Marcel Duchamp doing this. A man reflexively reaches for a sword while doing this thing as an alarm rings at Lycomedes’s court; that man was Achilles. The character of Ganymede appears in the Forest of Arden due to an instance of this planned by Rosalind in As You Like it. After a shipwreck in Illyria, Viola does this in order to serve Duke Orsino in Twelfth Night. For 10 points, name this self-presentation choice central to the Chinese legend of Hua Mulan and to drag shows.
ANSWER: crossdressing [or dressing in drag; or transvestitism; accept any answer involving dressing as another gender; accept dressing as a woman until “Ganymede” is read; prompt on "disguise” or “taking a new identity”; prompt answers involving acting like another gender] <MJ>
BHSAT 2013, Packet 10 wrote:1. Phosphofructokinase-1 is allosterically inhibited by the first intermediate in this pathway. Fatty acids enter this pathway following beta-oxidation. Aspartate can enter this pathway after being catabolized to fumarate. The input to this pathway is generated by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Coenzyme A is separated from acetyl, which is then added to oxaloacetate to form citric acid at the beginning of this pathway, which yields three NADH molecules and occurs in the mitochondrial matrix. The NADH is then sent to the electron transport chain in the mitochondria to complete the process of respiration. For 10 points, name this cycle that follows glycolysis in aerobic respiration.
ANSWER: Krebs cycle [or tricarboxylic acid cycle; or TCA cycle; or citric acid cycle until “citric acid” is read] <AS>
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Do you think I could see the tossups on "cross-dressing" and "Kreb's Cycle"? I believe the latter said something about phosphofructokinase catalyzing a step in the Kreb's cycle in the first clue, while I believe it actually catalyzes the third step of glycolysis (the answer I buzzed in with). I might have just jumped the gun and stupidly buzzed out of excitement.
In case you want to know what the first clue in the "Krebs cycle" tossup was describing: citrate is the first intermediate of the Krebs cycle (hence its alternate name, the citric acid cycle). When a cell has an excess of citrate, it "knows" that it has a lot of raw material for the Krebs cycle, and thus will be producing a lot of ATP through Krebs/oxidative phosphorylation. Hence, it does not need to devote resources to producing pyruvate via glycolysis => citrate inhibits phosphofructokinase, shutting down glycolysis (at its third step, as you noted). This is a very intentionalist explanation, but I hope it gets the idea across.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Excelsior (smack) wrote:
Do you think I could see the tossups on "cross-dressing" and "Kreb's Cycle"? I believe the latter said something about phosphofructokinase catalyzing a step in the Kreb's cycle in the first clue, while I believe it actually catalyzes the third step of glycolysis (the answer I buzzed in with). I might have just jumped the gun and stupidly buzzed out of excitement.
In case you want to know what the first clue in the "Krebs cycle" tossup was describing: citrate is the first intermediate of the Krebs cycle (hence its alternate name, the citric acid cycle). When a cell has an excess of citrate, it "knows" that it has a lot of raw material for the Krebs cycle, and thus will be producing a lot of ATP through Krebs/oxidative phosphorylation. Hence, it does not need to devote resources to producing pyruvate via glycolysis => citrate inhibits phosphofructokinase, shutting down glycolysis (at its third step, as you noted). This is a very intentionalist explanation, but I hope it gets the idea across.
That makes sense. It's also been three years since I took AP Biology, so I guess I shouldn't rely on that knowledge to get me first-line buzzes. I should probably also wait until I know what the question is looking for...

On the cross-dressing TU - this was a cool idea that I think worked pretty well. Maybe prompt on "hiding" as well, since that is what Achilles is doing (I realize that disguise is promptable). On the same note, I really enjoyed the cross-disciplinary TUs in this set and think more sets could start doing this. Even though I was playing solo in the playoffs, these TUs provided a fresh note and some unpredictably in the rounds, and also let every player on different teams have a shot at converting the TU.

Could I also see the tossup on "forgetting"? I learned about the Atkinsson-Shiffrin model in my Psychology class, but never did anything about it "failing," so I was pretty confused and decided to go ahead and buzz in with "memory."
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

BlueDevil95 wrote:Could I also see the tossup on "forgetting"? I learned about the Atkinsson-Shiffrin model in my Psychology class, but never did anything about it "failing," so I was pretty confused and decided to go ahead and buzz in with "memory."
BHSAT 2013, Round 2 wrote:17. This phenomenon can occur due to a failure at any of the Atkinson-Shiffrin model’s three stages. One study of this phenomenon included a set of 2,300 consonant-vowel-consonant nonsense syllables. This phenomenon, which can occur due to proactive or retroactive interference, is prevented by the primacy, recency, and serial position effects, and was modeled by an exponential decrease in Hermann Ebbinghaus’s curve. The “motivated” type of this is a defense mechanism closely related to repression. For 10 points, name this process accelerated by dementia in Alzheimer’s disease, and occurs to a large degree in sufferers of amnesia.
ANSWER: forgetting memories [or memory loss; do not accept “dementia”; prompt on “amnesia”] <MJ>
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by JamesIV »

The bakkie is absolutely central to July's People, and, as I recall, the word is used any number of times throughout the novel. "Pickup" probably should have been, in retrospect, an acceptable alternative answer line, as "bakkie" is simply what South Africans call a pickup.

Also - yes, I'm fairly confident Never Let Me Go is famous enough to be asked about. It's Ishiguro's best-known work after Remains of the Day, and was made into a film quite recently (2010).
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by vinteuil »

I remember hearing about Britomart in the Faerie Queene by Spenser in one question and another question asking for this work by Spenser, but I could be wrong.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

perlnerd666 wrote:I remember hearing about Britomart in the Faerie Queene by Spenser in one question and another question asking for this work by Spenser, but I could be wrong.
You did indeed - once in the bonus part on oreads (Packet 2) and the second time in the bonus part on The Faerie Queene (Packet 4), which includes Spenser's name. I'll cut the second mention from the bonus in Packet 4 and everything should be fine.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by alinktothefuture »

Could you post the "quantum computers" tossup? Thanks!
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

BHSAT 2013, packet 9 wrote:13. These devices use the Hadamard gate and other unitary matrix operators to manipulate their inputs. The set of problems practically solvable by these devices is BQP, which is thought to be a subclass of P. In 2001, one of these devices was used to show that “15 equals 3 times 5”. To do so, a technique developed by Peter Shor was used, and that technique could one day allow these devices to break RSA. D-Wave has built one type of these devices, which performs annealing using 128 qubits (“Q-bits”). For 10 points, name these devices, first proposed by Richard Feynman, that use distinctly non-classical phenomena to execute algorithms.
ANSWER: quantum computers [prompt on “computers”] <AS>
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Kafkaesque »

Could you post the toss-up on cubism? I remember being surprised that Braque came up so early (around the middle of the question), but maybe I just zoned out and it was actually closer to the end.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

Kafkaesque wrote:Could you post the toss-up on cubism? I remember being surprised that Braque came up so early (around the middle of the question), but maybe I just zoned out and it was actually closer to the end.
BHSAT 2013, Packet 5 wrote:2. This movement’s sculptures include a boy riding piggyback in Mother and Child, by Jacques Lipchitz. A forearm in one painting of this style has X-shaped cuts on it and holds a broken sword. Violin and Candlestick and Houses at L’Estaque are by one of its developers, Georges Braque. Its prototype paintings included the African mask-like faces on five nude women in Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. A mural in this style shows a screaming horse in black and white during the bombing of a Basque town. For 10 points, name this movement exemplified by Guernica and other late Picasso paintings, which showed many sides of 3D objects in abstracted flat forms.
ANSWER: cubism [or cubist movement; prompt on "abstract art”; do not accept “abstract expressionism”] <MJ>
I presumed that anything about Georges Braque is less notable/famous than the two most famous cubist paintings by Picasso, so his name appears in the middle of line 3 out of 5.5 lines.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Kafkaesque »

Now that I see the clues that follow Braque, I can understand why you mentioned him there. It seems to drop off in difficulty quite a bit after Braque, but that's understandable since there aren't that many famous cubist works.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by The Stately Rhododendron »

If I recall right, the tossup on Labour had Kier Hardie as its first line. I thought that was pretty easy, but maybe that's just me.
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Re: Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg »

Mr. Joyboy wrote:If I recall right, the tossup on Labour had Kier Hardie as its first line. I thought that was pretty easy, but maybe that's just me.
I don't remember the lead-in that well (I think the second line was about Clause IV?) but Kier Hardie seems perfectly appropriate for the lead-in of a regular difficulty high school set.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

The 2013 BHSAT set is now publicly posted here, and this thread has now been moved out of the subforum into general discussion.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Corry »

I normally don't have much to say about the question sets that I play, but I did find one question in this set to particularly weird: the question about cross-dressing. I recognized the first clue about Bonnie Prince Charlie, who fled England dressed as an Irish maid after the 1745 rising, but based on that single clue, I had no idea what the question was asking for. I thought the answer line would be "escaping from England" or something along those lines. After all, Flora MacDonald gave Bonnie Prince Charlie her dress so that he could... escape from England (well technically Scotland, but whatever). Cross-dressing would definitely not have been my first guess, and I don't feel that the first clue of this question sufficiently indicated what it was asking for.

Anyways, since I'm a history specialist with no knowledge whatsoever of pretty much any other subject, I didn't recognize a single clue after that first line, and proceeded to lose that question. Of course, with the packet officially cleared and nationals approaching in less than a week, I suppose it's too late to address this problem now. But I just wanted to throw my opinion out there. :party:
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by The Dance of Sorrow »

I LOVED the crossdressing tossup. It's hard to write good questions on novel anwerlines like that but I thought that that one was really well done.

I lost a game on this set because I said "Spaghetti Westerns" part of the way through the "westerns" tossup and got negged, then lost the protest. According to somebody else all of the films mentioned in the tossup make my answer correct.

I heard complaints that Ibn Battuta was a really hard hard part in one bonus (maybe on the Mali?). Any thoughts?
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by vinteuil »

Golden-bellied Starfrontlet wrote:I LOVED the crossdressing tossup. It's hard to write good questions on novel anwerlines like that but I thought that that one was really well done.

I lost a game on this set because I said "Spaghetti Westerns" part of the way through the "westerns" tossup and got negged, then lost the protest. According to somebody else all of the films mentioned in the tossup make my answer correct.

I heard complaints that Ibn Battuta was a really hard hard part in one bonus (maybe on the Mali?). Any thoughts?
I know that Ibn Battuta is covered in our AP world history curriculum, but that could be unusual. I certainly thought he was well-known.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Adventure Temple Trail »

I tried to temporally locate the crossdressing incident by saying "while on the isle of Skye;" if that didn't narrow down the answer enough I apologize.

The westerns tossup had instructions to accept "spaghetti western" until the word "American" was read, preceding a description of The Magnificent Seven, which was made in America and therefore is not a spaghetti western. After the word "American" was read, the answer of "spaghetti western" did not apply to all the clues.

I won't defend a bonus part on ibn Battuta to the death if it was poorly converted in actual gameplay; he's someone I had learned about in kids' history books in elementary school as well as in seventh grade world history, and came across as one of very few primary sources on the Mali empire each time I've written a question on it, so I figured those experiences (or similar ones, such as AP World classes) might allow knowledgeable players to get the part.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by The Dance of Sorrow »

Thanks for the Western clarification, I definitely buzzed after that point.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Kafkaesque »

If it means anything, I briefly learned about Ibn Battuta in my AP World class last year.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Jason Cheng »

Corry wrote: Anyways, since I'm a history specialist with no knowledge whatsoever of pretty much any other subject, I didn't recognize a single clue after that first line, and proceeded to lose that question. Of course, with the packet officially cleared and nationals approaching in less than a week, I suppose it's too late to address this problem now. But I just wanted to throw my opinion out there. :party:
It's okay, I got it on the second line for you :grin:

But in all seriousness, I'm going to have to agree with Corry here--I knew the Flora Macdonald story too, but I had no idea what to buzz with until I heard "Rrose Selavy," after which I figured it out and buzzed somewhere around "Marcel Duchamp." Maybe it was just the unorthodox answer line, but to me, it felt like it was almost impossible to get the tossup based on the first sentence alone, even with a pretty okay knowledge of what the clue is talking about (I'm no history specialist).
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

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Round 3, Tossup 10 wrote: 10. One modern artist from this country often depicts mushrooms with cartoon eyes and fangs. Exhibits of this country’s art in Paris inspired the asymmetric design of Little Girl in a Blue Armchair and The Boating Party by Mary Cassatt and the décor of Whistler’s Peacock Room. One “floating world” style woodblock print in a series from this country shows a far-off snow-capped mountain as boats capsize under a blue, cresting “Great Wave”. For 10 points, name this home of the ukiyo-e style, a non-European country where artist Hokusai Katsushika created Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji.
ANSWER: Japan [or Nihon; or Nippon] <MJ>
What artist/art piece is the first clue talking about?
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Masked Canadian History Bandit »

kibinai wrote:
Round 3, Tossup 10 wrote: 10. One modern artist from this country often depicts mushrooms with cartoon eyes and fangs. Exhibits of this country’s art in Paris inspired the asymmetric design of Little Girl in a Blue Armchair and The Boating Party by Mary Cassatt and the décor of Whistler’s Peacock Room. One “floating world” style woodblock print in a series from this country shows a far-off snow-capped mountain as boats capsize under a blue, cresting “Great Wave”. For 10 points, name this home of the ukiyo-e style, a non-European country where artist Hokusai Katsushika created Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji.
ANSWER: Japan [or Nihon; or Nippon] <MJ>
What artist/art piece is the first clue talking about?
Nintendo's Goombas?
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Eddie »

Masked Canadian History Bandit wrote:
kibinai wrote:
Round 3, Tossup 10 wrote: 10. One modern artist from this country often depicts mushrooms with cartoon eyes and fangs. Exhibits of this country’s art in Paris inspired the asymmetric design of Little Girl in a Blue Armchair and The Boating Party by Mary Cassatt and the décor of Whistler’s Peacock Room. One “floating world” style woodblock print in a series from this country shows a far-off snow-capped mountain as boats capsize under a blue, cresting “Great Wave”. For 10 points, name this home of the ukiyo-e style, a non-European country where artist Hokusai Katsushika created Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji.
ANSWER: Japan [or Nihon; or Nippon] <MJ>
What artist/art piece is the first clue talking about?
Nintendo's Goombas?
That's what I initially thought, but I think both the classification of Goombas as "mushrooms" and as "art" is debatable.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Mewto55555 »

I would assume Takashi Murakami, but I too could be mistaken.
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Re: BHSAT 2013 Individual/Specific Question Discussion

Post by Eddie »

Mewto55555 wrote:I would assume Takashi Murakami, but I too could be mistaken.
Looks like you're right.
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